ARBORICULTURE

noun: The cultivation of trees and shrubs for ornamental purposes.

early 19th century: from Latin arbor ‘tree’ + culture, on the pattern of words such as agriculture .

We take a lot of pride in working with trees, we will always do our upmost to find the balance between what is best for your trees, safety and aesthetics.

Pruning covers the majority work we undertake and covers a broad spectrum from tiny cuts with secateurs and bigger cuts with a chainsaw. Here is a brief description of pruning cuts from the Arboriculture Association – Every pruning cut inflicts a wound on the tree. The ability of a tree to withstand a wound and maintain healthy growth is greatly affected by the pruning cut – its size, angle and position relative to the retained parts of the tree. As a general rule branches should be removed at their point of attachment or shortened to a lateral which is at least 1/3 of the diameter of the removed portion of the branch, and all cuts should be kept as small as possible
Reasons for pruning include maintaining a tree in a safe condition, removal of dead branches, manage the size and shape or to improve the quality of fruit and timber. Improper pruning can lead to trees becoming unsightly, diseased and/or potentially dangerous.

We keep up to date with current practices and changing scientific research and our work is always carried out in line with British standards, one of the the highest in the world
BS3998: 2010 Recommendations for Tree Work and
BS5837: 2012 Trees in Relation to Design, Demolition and Construction – Recommendations.

Crown Reduction

Crown reductions are typically prescribed to:

• reduce mechanical stress on individual branches or the whole tree,
• make the tree more suited to its immediate environment or to
• reduce the effects of shading and light loss, etc.

The final result will retain the main framework of the crown, and so a significant proportion of the leaf bearing structure, and leave a similar, although smaller outline, and not necessarily achieve symmetry for its own sake. Crown reduction cuts will be as small as possible and in general not exceed 100mm diameter. Not all species are suitable for this treatment and crown reduction should not be confused with ‘topping’, an indiscriminate and harmful treatment.

Crown Thin

Crown thinning is the removal of a portion of smaller/tertiary branches, usually at the outer crown, to produce a uniform density of foliage around an evenly spaced branch structure. It is usually confined to broad-leaved species. Crown thinning does not alter the overall size or shape of the tree. Material should be removed systematically throughout the tree, should not exceed the stated percentage and not more than 30% overall. Common reasons for crown thinning are to allow more light to pass through the tree, reduce wind resistance, reduce weight (but this does not necessarily reduce leverage on the structure) and is rarely a once-only operation particularly on species that are known to produce large amounts of epicormic growth.

 

Crown Lift or Crown Raising

Crown lifting is the removal of the lowest branches and/or preparing of lower branches for future removal. Good practice dictates crown lifting should not normally include the removal of large branches growing directly from the trunk as this can cause large wounds which can become extensively decayed leading to further long term problems or more short term biomechanical instability. Crown lifting on older, mature trees should be avoided or restricted to secondary branches or shortening of primary branches rather than the whole removal wherever possible. Crown lifting is an effective method of increasing light transmission to areas closer to the tree or to enable access under the crown but should be restricted to less than 15% of the live crown height and leave the crown at least two thirds of the total height of the tree. Crown lifting should be specified with reference to a fixed point, e.g. ‘crown lift to give 5.5m clearance above ground level’.

Tips for correct pruning cuts

Every pruning cut inflicts a wound on the tree. The ability of a tree to withstand a wound and maintain healthy growth is greatly affected by the pruning cut – its size, angle and position relative to the retained parts of the tree. As a general rule branches should be removed at their point of attachment or shortened to a lateral which is at least 1/3 of the diameter of the removed portion of the branch, and all cuts should be kept as small as possible.

Removals and Felling

Always the last resort in our eyes but reasons for this procedure include safety concerns due to disease or fungal infection, giving more space to a better specimen, sometimes trees are just planted or self seeded in the wrong place! Also felling is an important practice in sustainable woodland management and timber production and we have a wealth of experience in turning woodland trees into useful and sellable products.

Planting

Proper planting of trees ensures a healthy early root development – crucial for a trees longevity. Early formative crown pruning and correct soil treatment gives young trees the best chance of becoming splendid specimens in the future.

Veteran tree Management

Veteran trees are very important to our local ecology and their proper management is something I hold close to my heart. I volunteer my free time at the weekends to help the Woodland Trust with the management of their ancient woodland trees and I have a few different veteran trees I help manage (usually involves doing very little!). I am always reading and learning, attending courses and seminars about the correct way to help these magnificent trees.

Veteranisation

This is the process of selectively encouraging veteran tree style habitat in mature trees, this is purely an ecological exercise and carried out on trees that have either low aesthetics or timber value. I really enjoy this kind of management practice as it allows me to provide valuable missing habitat for wildlife whilst unleashing my inner artist!

REVIEWS

Will cleared my very overgrown small garden, and did a beautiful job of laying the hedge. He is excellent - prompt, efficient, and fitted me in even when he was busy. Highly recommended!

Kate Newey

Will and his colleague came to fell 3 HUGE trees for us today and did a fabulous job. Really friendly and professional service, I will certainly be asking them back in the autumn for round 3 of attacking the trees! Thank you!

Hollie Simmonds

Excellent service, friendly and tree removed within a couple of days, great price and all left in a neat state when job finished. Would highly recommend Will.

Anna

Will is super helpful, quick and thorough. He has done several great jobs for me, and I would HIGHLY recommend his services.

Charlie Lane